Date of Award

5-20-2011

Degree Type

Thesis-Restricted

Degree Name

M.A.

Degree Program

History

Department

History

Major Professor

Mizell-Nelson, Michael

Second Advisor

Cassimere, Jr., Raphael

Third Advisor

Mitchell, Mary N.

Abstract

Women commonly sold goods on the streets of New Orleans throughout the city‘s colonial and antebellum history. Forming a significant presence among the city‘s market places, they sold various food items which included coffee, calas, and pralines. Perhaps the most popular of the African-American street vendors was the praline women. They attracted the attention of visitors as well as residents. Despite the popularity of these treats, the highly visible and enterprising praline vendors were simultaneously celebrated and caricatured by white observers who depicted them as mammy figures not only in store advertisements and logos, but also in everyday annotations.

Rights

The University of New Orleans and its agents retain the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible this dissertation or thesis in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. The author retains all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis or dissertation

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