Date of Award

5-20-2005

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.S.

Degree Program

Environmental Engineering

Department

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Major Professor

Kura, Bhaskar

Second Advisor

Barbe, Donald

Third Advisor

McManis, Kenneth

Abstract

Abrasive blasting process optimization is aimed at establishing relationships between applied feed rates and resulting productivity and consumption rates. It is clear that the high costs of disposal of the multimedia wastes generated by the dry abrasive blasting processes are of increasing concern in the future of shipbuilding industry. In such circumstances essential care has to be given to all components of the process to enhance productivity and decrease consumption rates. This study discusses most of the process components and their respective effects on blasting productivity and consumption rates briefly and concentrates on two important process parameters, nozzle pressure and abrasive feed rate. Feed rate is a vital process parameter that contributes to the productivity and consumption rates of the process. Subsequently feed rates also can significantly impact the costs bore by Shipbuilding Industry in the form of disposal and environmental costs. Most commonly used abrasives were identified through a rigorous survey and were opted to be used in this study. The approach adopted to develop the relationships consists of a mass balance equation between the expended abrasives and disposed wastes to clean a predetermined area of a plate. The obtained data was further analysed to develop productivity rates and consumption rates for each sample runs. The data was then evaluated to formulate relationships that would enable the derivation of optimum feed rates for desirable productivity and reduced waste generation.

Rights

The University of New Orleans and its agents retain the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible this dissertation or thesis in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. The author retains all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis or dissertation.

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