Date of Award

5-20-2005

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Degree Program

Curriculum & Instruction

Department

Curriculum and Instruction

Major Professor

Killacky, Jim

Second Advisor

Talmadge, Andrew

Third Advisor

Gifford, Charles

Fourth Advisor

Flug, Christine

Fifth Advisor

Slavant, Dee

Sixth Advisor

Thames, Marvin

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to ascertain non-traditional students', traditional students', and their faculty's perceptions as to effective teaching behaviors in the office systems technology programs on six of the campuses of the Louisiana Technical College and to determine any significant differences in perceptions held by the respective groups—non-traditional students, traditional students, faculty of non-traditional students, and faculty of traditional students. The theoretical framework of this study is drawn from Knowles' concept of andragogy and Bruner's constructivist theory. The design of this study was nonexperimental descriptive research in nature. It used a survey instrument to collect data as to the perceptions of effective teaching behaviors of the respective groups. Two survey instruments were used—one for students and one for faculty. Both instruments were of like format, using a 7-point Likert scale for determination of perceived teaching behavior effectiveness. The faculty instrument was derived from the results of student data collection. The student sample was 299, and the faculty sample was 14. The prime objective of this study was to assemble data from a significant number of the target population for comparison, to summarize findings, and to evaluate any relevant patterns of significance in and among the groups. Methods of statistical analysis used in this study were Mann-Whitney U Statistical Procedure, T-Test for Independent Samples, and Spearman Correlation. This study revealed important differences in the perceptions as to effective teaching behaviors of non-traditional students, traditional students, faculty of non-traditional students, and faculty of traditional students in the office systems technology program of the Louisiana Technical College. These differences are described and analyzed. Implications for a range of stakeholders and suggestions for further research are presented.

Rights

The University of New Orleans and its agents retain the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible this dissertation or thesis in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. The author retains all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis or dissertation.

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