Date of Award

8-9-2006

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Degree Program

Human Performance and Health Promotion

Department

Human Performance and Health Promotion

Major Professor

Kontos, Anthony

Second Advisor

Cropley, Lorelei

Third Advisor

Loftin, Mark

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of SES and acculturation/enculturation to body image perceptions and overweight (i.e. BMI) among African American college women. A secondary purpose was to examine which factors predicted BMI. Participants included 101 African American women from the University of New Orleans, aged 18-39 years of age. Participants completed a demographic information sheet, and four questionnaires assessing the components of body image and levels of acculturation/enculturation. There was no significant main effect of SES on levels of acculturation/enculturation. There was no significant effect of SES on the cognitive and behavioral components of body image. However, SES related to the affective component of body image. A significant interaction was found for SES and acculturation/enculturation on the affective component of body image, but no such effects were found for the cognitive and behavioral components of body image, or BMI. The cognitive component of body image was a significant predictor of BMI.

Rights

The University of New Orleans and its agents retain the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible this dissertation or thesis in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. The author retains all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis or dissertation.

Share

COinS