Date of Award

5-16-2003

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Degree Program

Curriculum & Instruction

Department

Curriculum and Instruction

Major Professor

Speaker, Richard

Abstract

This interpretive qualitative study examined university ESL instructors' experiences using technologies and their personal views of technology integration. The study also explored the factors that affected these instructors' decisions for using computer and other technologies in their teaching. The informants in the study were five ESL instructors from five different institutions of higher learning in the southern state. The qualitative data were collected mainly through interviews along with self-report surveys and document materials. Overall positive statements were found in the instructors' experience and perception of their technology use in teaching. Nevertheless, it appears that these instructors' computer use is very minimal and their beliefs and perceptions of technology use are impacted by their experience of using technologies. Eight influential factors are identified from the emerged themes in affecting these instructors' technology decisions. The factors include: perceived benefits or value; anxiety; personal style; machines and language teaching; environment; peer influence; teaching style; and time. The findings in this study also indicate that instructors' demographic information has no influence on their perceptions and use of technology despite whether or not they use computers in instruction and how they use them.

Rights

The University of New Orleans and its agents retain the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible this dissertation or thesis in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. The author retains all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis or dissertation.

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