Status

undergraduate student

Loading...

Media is loading
 

Submission Type

Oral Presentation

Description

Smoking tobacco ranks as the leading cause of bodily disease and the number one preventable cause of death among adults in the US. Despite medical and public health advancement, such as screening and treatment of tobacco use, disparities in the quality of health care still exist. Quality healthcare, considered the assessment and provision of effective and safe care, reflected in a culture of excellence, resulting in the attainment of optimal or desired health, improves patient trust and health outcomes. Establishing a culture of excellence includes improving patient provider communication, an important variable in patient centered care. Patients that experience effective patient-provider communication have better recovery habits, mindsets, and health outcomes. Thus, poor quality of healthcare directly can effect smoking cessation efforts. This study examined the association between measures of effective patient-provider communication and perceived quality of care among current smokers.

Using a cross-sectional study design, we examined nationally represented data from the 2017, 2018, 2019 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). Perceived quality of health care was determined by respondents rating their health care in the past twelve months as excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor. Measures of patient-provider communication included how often respondents reported providers: always listened carefully, explained things, showed respect, spent enough time, and involved them in joint decision-making Current smokers were defined as participants who reported smoking 100 cigarettes in their entire life that currently smoke some days or every day. Descriptive statistics included age, gender, race, income, education, and sexual orientation. Chi-square analysis determined differences between respondents who reported excellent quality of health care and respondents who reported satisfactory or below quality of healthcare. Logistic regression determined the relationship between perceived quality of care and patient-provider communication variables after adjusting for covariates.

Among the 1,481 participants included in this study, majority reported between 51- 60 years old (29%), female (54%), heterosexual (87%), white (54%), with greater than a high school diploma (62%), and an annual income < 20K (31%). Chi square analysis revealed a statistically significant difference (p

Data analysis revealed a possible relationship between patient-provider communication and effective quality of healthcare for smokers. Medical and public health policies and training related to improving quality of health care for smokers should implement effective patient-provider communication for future interventions.

Comments

Brian Washington received the "MVP Student" award, for going the extra mile to drive up engagement in the symposium forums.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

Share

COinS
 

Effective Patient-Provider Communication and Perceived Quality of Care among Current Smokers

Smoking tobacco ranks as the leading cause of bodily disease and the number one preventable cause of death among adults in the US. Despite medical and public health advancement, such as screening and treatment of tobacco use, disparities in the quality of health care still exist. Quality healthcare, considered the assessment and provision of effective and safe care, reflected in a culture of excellence, resulting in the attainment of optimal or desired health, improves patient trust and health outcomes. Establishing a culture of excellence includes improving patient provider communication, an important variable in patient centered care. Patients that experience effective patient-provider communication have better recovery habits, mindsets, and health outcomes. Thus, poor quality of healthcare directly can effect smoking cessation efforts. This study examined the association between measures of effective patient-provider communication and perceived quality of care among current smokers.

Using a cross-sectional study design, we examined nationally represented data from the 2017, 2018, 2019 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). Perceived quality of health care was determined by respondents rating their health care in the past twelve months as excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor. Measures of patient-provider communication included how often respondents reported providers: always listened carefully, explained things, showed respect, spent enough time, and involved them in joint decision-making Current smokers were defined as participants who reported smoking 100 cigarettes in their entire life that currently smoke some days or every day. Descriptive statistics included age, gender, race, income, education, and sexual orientation. Chi-square analysis determined differences between respondents who reported excellent quality of health care and respondents who reported satisfactory or below quality of healthcare. Logistic regression determined the relationship between perceived quality of care and patient-provider communication variables after adjusting for covariates.

Among the 1,481 participants included in this study, majority reported between 51- 60 years old (29%), female (54%), heterosexual (87%), white (54%), with greater than a high school diploma (62%), and an annual income < 20K (31%). Chi square analysis revealed a statistically significant difference (p

Data analysis revealed a possible relationship between patient-provider communication and effective quality of healthcare for smokers. Medical and public health policies and training related to improving quality of health care for smokers should implement effective patient-provider communication for future interventions.