Event Title

The Neurobehavioral Effect of Acetaminophen During Early-Life on Social

Submission Type

Oral Presentation

Description

Acetaminophen (APAP), or commonly known as Tylenol, is used frequently to treat children and pregnant women with cold-like symptoms. Acetaminophen in previous studies has been linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactive (ADHD). To date no studies have examined interaction between early-life inflammation and APAP exposure. This experiment focused on early-life exposure to APAP with inflammation present effects social behavior in mice. We hypothesize exposure to inflammation and APAP in early life is relevant to the emergence of ASD. Methods: Mice are bred in the lab. Experimental litters receive two injection: (1) saline or IL-1β (.2μg/kg) followed by (2) saline or APAP on days P5, P8, and P11. After weaning on P21, social interaction test and open field test were performed. Behaviors were scored using videos and experimenter was blind to condition of mouse. Results: Social interaction test demonstrate APAP exposed mice have greater latency in starting a social interaction. APAP exposed male mice perform nose-to-nose sniffing for longer durations of time. Mice exposed to IL-1β have greater occurrence of avoidance, following, and tail sniffing behaviors. Male mice exposed to IL-1β and APAP demonstrate longer durations of initiated social behavior. Open field result demonstrates mice exposed to IL-1β and APAP show greater anxiety. Conclusions: Male mice exposed to IL-1β and APAP a difference in social behaviors. According to the data, it can be infer exposure to IL-1β and APAP in early life are responsible for changes in social behavior, which supports our initial hypothesis.

Comments

Honorable Mention, Undergraduate Presentation

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

The Neurobehavioral Effect of Acetaminophen During Early-Life on Social

Acetaminophen (APAP), or commonly known as Tylenol, is used frequently to treat children and pregnant women with cold-like symptoms. Acetaminophen in previous studies has been linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactive (ADHD). To date no studies have examined interaction between early-life inflammation and APAP exposure. This experiment focused on early-life exposure to APAP with inflammation present effects social behavior in mice. We hypothesize exposure to inflammation and APAP in early life is relevant to the emergence of ASD. Methods: Mice are bred in the lab. Experimental litters receive two injection: (1) saline or IL-1β (.2μg/kg) followed by (2) saline or APAP on days P5, P8, and P11. After weaning on P21, social interaction test and open field test were performed. Behaviors were scored using videos and experimenter was blind to condition of mouse. Results: Social interaction test demonstrate APAP exposed mice have greater latency in starting a social interaction. APAP exposed male mice perform nose-to-nose sniffing for longer durations of time. Mice exposed to IL-1β have greater occurrence of avoidance, following, and tail sniffing behaviors. Male mice exposed to IL-1β and APAP demonstrate longer durations of initiated social behavior. Open field result demonstrates mice exposed to IL-1β and APAP show greater anxiety. Conclusions: Male mice exposed to IL-1β and APAP a difference in social behaviors. According to the data, it can be infer exposure to IL-1β and APAP in early life are responsible for changes in social behavior, which supports our initial hypothesis.