Date of Award

Summer 8-6-2018

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.S.

Degree Program

Earth and Environmental Sciences

Department

Earth and Environmental Sciences

Major Professor

Dr. Ioannis Georgiou

Second Advisor

Dr. Michael Miner

Third Advisor

Dr. Dirk-Jan Walstra

Abstract

In Louisiana, barrier islands are undergoing morphological change driven by high rates of relative sea-level rise and interior wetland loss. Previous works utilized historical region-scale bathymetry and shoreline change analyses to assess coastal evolution. However, more localized assessments considering the role of sediment transport processes in regional evolution are lacking. This is essential to predicting coastal change trajectories and allocating limited sand resources for nourishment. Using bathymetric and shoreline data, 100-m spaced shore-normal transects were created to track meter-scale elevation change for 1880s, 1930s, 1980s, 2006, and 2015. An automated framework was used to quantify and track parameters such as shoreline change, barrier island area and width, bathymetric isobath migration, and shoreface slope. Our results illustrate that monitoring subaerial island erosion rates are insufficient for evaluating regional sediment dynamics of transgressive coastal systems. Advances in understanding these processes will facilitate more informed planning, management, and mitigation of transgressive barrier islands.

Rights

The University of New Orleans and its agents retain the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible this dissertation or thesis in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. The author retains all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis or dissertation.

Available for download on Tuesday, August 06, 2019

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