Date of Award

Spring 5-31-2021

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Degree Program

Political Science

Department

Political Science

Major Professor

Michael Huelshoff

Second Advisor

Christine Day

Third Advisor

Eric van Holm

Abstract

Women in sub-Saharan Africa are often viewed as the victims of the conflict around them. This view discredits the hundreds of women who are serving in legislative and executive branches across the region. This research investigates if women in positions of power make more peaceful decisions in times of conflict than their male counterparts. Using negative binomial regression methods this research examines the percentages of women in legislative and executive branches to number of conflict days in a year and number of peace agreements signed. This study found that as the percentage of women in office rise the number of conflict days each year decreases. On the hand, as the percentage of women rise, the number of peace treaties signed decreases as well. These findings align with the literature that women have a different approach to conflict, and that approach leads to significant impacts on conflict levels within their state.

Rights

The University of New Orleans and its agents retain the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible this dissertation or thesis in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. The author retains all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis or dissertation.

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